Blogs by Bahais

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The Surprise

Pearlz Dreaming

I like to go through my day mindful of my surroundings, letting thoughts rush through me.

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Noticing the shadows cast by the trees and the gaps of green between them.

Noticing the bird, is it a pheasant? disappearing into the woods.

Thinking about what happened in Nagasaki all those years ago.

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Noticing the delicacy of the spider’s web draped across a leaf

announcing its artistry.

announcing the delicacy of human relationships.

And then sometimes there are surprises like a new chainsaw sculpture – this time an Emu with eggs.

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Walking mindfully is full of disturbances, ruptures, and then rewards

leading me to think of poems and stories everywhere I go and be, and dream

the possibility of peace.

(c)  June Perkins

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Recommended Link: Starved for Time? Here’s a Surprising – and Easy – Solution

Everybody Means Something

Christine Carter, Ph.D., is a Senior Fellow at the GGSC Christine Carter, Ph.D., is a Senior Fellow at the GGSC

. . . . . the sign of contemplation is silence, because it is impossible for a man to do two things at one time—he cannot both speak and meditate.

(‘Abdu’l-Bahá Paris Talks page 174)

There is a lot of evidence building up to reinforce the idea that quietness of mind, a current theme of mine, is a very positive experience indeed. In November this year for example there was a post on the Greater Good website suggesting this and pointing us in the direction of supportive evidence such as from Matt Killingworth’s piece of July 2013:

How does mind-wandering relate to happiness? We found that people are substantially less happy when their minds are wandering than when they’re not, which is unfortunate considering we do it so often. Moreover, the size of this effect is large—how often…

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The Effects of Mindfulness (3): apples in the air

Everybody Means Something

Mind Image scanned from Marcel Paquet ‘Magritte’ (Taschen)

My much earlier post on interconnectedness included a declaration of intent – I was going to seek a deeper understanding of the concept both by reading and by the practice of mindfulness, amongst other things. So, how have things been going in this phase of mindfulness practice, drawn from Mark Williams and Danny Penman’s book on Mindfulness?

I was dreading the Mindful Movement meditation. For a start it just feels weird, standing in a room with windows to the outdoors, following softly spoken instructions to reach in the air for an imaginary apple. The other stuff simply amounted to sawn off flexibility exercises. I couldn’t see how any of that could be conducive to mindfulness. The succeeding Breath and Body exercise was bread and butter to me – it made sense and was very like what I have been practicing off and…

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Recommended link: Happiness is in the Mind

Peter reads some interesting texts.

Everybody Means Something

Seven IllusionsI am moving after years of only using a meditation based on following the breath, which serves to keep me reasonably grounded, to practising mindfulness meditation, which is designed to go somewhat further. It’s for this reason, I think, that I am on the look out all the time for hints and ideas to help me move forwards.

There is a recent post on Karen Wilson’s blog which hits a very important nail on the head for me about why attempting to achieve such a goal is so important, and why we need to be teaching it in schools as Layard and Clark suggest in their book Thrive. It deals, amongst other things dear to my heart, with the need to balance left- and right-brain modes of thinking as per Iain McGilchrist’s excellent book The Master and his Emissary.

I also downloaded her book recently and have just begun to read it: it contains many…

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