Blogs by Bahais

A compilation


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Jeanette Lock

Such a great archive of stories being built here, would be so great to see more blogs like this across the world.

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Some Interesting Reads

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Reading – by June Perkins

Some interesting articles you might like to check out

Using Art to Find Your Spiritual Identity

Art Uplifting the World of Being

Music and Inner Harmony

Baha’i Blog Images from Around the World

Baha’i Chronicles

Leaves of Wisdom: A Baha’i Coloring Source

Studio Sessions Channel

Nineteen Months

Happy Reading, viewing and listening.


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Twitter Themes During 2015 Australian Historical Association Conference

Stumbling Through the Past

word cloud Most commonly used words in #OzHA2015 tweets during the 2015 Australian Historical Association Conference. Click on the word cloud to enlarge it. Click on it again to be taken to the data behind this word cloud. I love this facility from Voyant Tools!

During the four days of open sessions at the conference, participants tweeted over forty thousand words excluding hashtags and Twitter handles. This year’s conference had the biggest Twitter stream of any Australian Historical Association conference since 2012 and as my last post showed, more people tweeted the conference than ever before.

A conference Twitter stream is a news service for those who cannot attend the event.  It is a crowd note-taking service which participants can refer to in order to jog their memory, find out what happened in sessions they did not attend and to provide added commentary which enriches the conference discourse.

Yet we need…

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Big Questions in History: History’s Relevance in Contemporary Society

Stumbling Through the Past

Family history is an important entrée into wider historical interests for many people in our society. But historian Anna Clark asks if connecting to the past through personal experience shuts out other personal experiences?

Anna Clark from University of Technology, Sydney was one of five historians who spoke at the popular ‘Big Questions in History’ panel at the recent conference of the Australian Historical Association. This plenary session is devoted to a critical discussion about the connections between historians and Australian society. It has been held at every conference I have attended since 2012 and is a dynamic, thought-provoking session.

Anna Clark Anna Clark

Clark’s question is pertinent. While we are absorbed in our own family history research are we alert to the lives of others who lived in the same community as our ancestors? We may have built a fascinating story about our ancestor but embellishments and silences handed down over the…

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“Genealogists are becoming the new social historians” says professional historian

Stumbling Through the Past

three women and one man standing in front of a table with flowers and two copies of Fractured Families standing up. Lisa Murray (City of Sydney Historian), Jo Toohey (CEO of the Benevolent Society), Tanya Evans (author of Fractured Families) and Max Carrick (family historian mentioned in Fractured Families). Photo courtesy of the Benevolent Society.

“Australian history has been transformed by the contributions of family historians”, says Dr Tanya Evans, historian at Sydney’s Macquarie University. Her new book Fractured Families: Life on the Margins in Colonial New South Wales, is the result of collaboration between Tanya Evans and some of the many family historians who have worked with the archives of Sydney’s oldest non-religious charity, The Benevolent Society.

“… genealogists are becoming the new social historians…”, remarks Evans in the prologue. She points to the painstaking research conducted by family historians which has revealed the lives of those of their forebears who were numbered among the poor and the outcast.  Fractured Families  is about those forgotten people of history…

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Launching Bahá’í Chronicles

Congratulations to all those involved in Baha’i Chronicles.

Pearlz Dreaming

heroes

Three years ago, Neda  Najibi started a series on her Facebook page titled ‘Did You Know?’ portraying stories about Bahá’í Heroes and Heroines. She  did this because she noticed there wasn’t a single online location systematically attempting to capture the heroism, struggles, victories, sacrifices, and  the dedication of  past and present Bahá’ís.

The death of Neda’s father (Nassir Najibi 1925-2013) gave her the impetus to launch Bahá’í Chronicles, to honour the many heroes and heroines, past and present, of the Bahá’í Faith.

She undertook the project to honour the memory of her father and feels he has been her guiding light for the past two years of putting this site together. 

The team that have created the site are: Neda Nassir Najibi, Co-Founder and Editor; Vanda Marie Khadem, Co-Founder. Bahá’í Chronicles intentionally does not make mention of the creators’ collegiate years, career environment or achievements but rather…

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Civil Rights, History, Now

Yvonne has this to say about her blogging:

This blog is a place of conversation and sharing. After I finished history honours at the University of Sydney in 2010 I wanted to pass on what I had learned to others who are interested. However, my learning has not stopped with the end of my university education. Since then I have worked as a research assistant on a project examining the history of teaching reading in Australia as well as some other projects. Currently I am researching the beliefs of Australian soldiers serving on the frontline in World War I. As this abstract about my initial research indicates, I am interested in what the soldier’s wrote in their diaries and letters about their beliefs.

Three elements form the core of my historical work:

  1. Thorough archival research, the bedrock of an historian’s job;
  2. The use of technology to gain historical insights and higher productivity in my work, which I discuss in my digital humanities blog, Stumbling Through the Future, and;
  3. Effective publicity of the work of historians drawing on my previous work in public relations and my professional use of social media.

I am a member of the Professional Historians Association of New South Wales.  I have conducted Continuing Professional Development sessions for their members about how historians can use social media effectively for their professional development and publicity of their work.

This blog does not merely focus on my current research.  I share the history I encounter in my everyday life through reviews of books that I read for pleasure and work, exhibitions I visit, conferences I attend, history of places I travel to as well as issues currently of interest to the public and profession.  For the last couple of years I volunteered for the Australian Women Writers’ Challenge, looking after the genres of histories, biographies and memoirs.

This blog is part of my commitment to share what I have learned with anyone who is interested, but it goes further than that.  Yes, there is much learning in the academy but there is also a lot to learn from so many other people.  Family history is booming, people love reading biographies and many are engaged in activities ranging from historical re-enactments, local history to histories of organisations such as clubs and places of worship.  Everyone has their own life story which includes knowledge of the past.  I have much to learn from all this.

This blog is about listening as well as imparting.  It is about collaboration and sharing.  I hope that this site will contribute to this ethos.  This blog is a place where the general public who is interested in history can mingle with professional and academic historians.  Please feel free to share your observations and knowledge through comments on these pages

Stumbling Through the Past

The right to vote has been a struggle the world over. Agitation for the right to participate in the election of the government is a common them in the history of many nations. Associated with the right to vote are a host of related rights: the right to equal access to public venues, the right to equal access to education, to equal treatment by the law…

In recent weeks there have been many fiftieth anniversaries of momentous events of the Civil Rights era. The Civil Rights movement had its heart in the United States but pulsed throughout the world. Recently in Australia the fiftieth anniversary of the ‘Student Action for Aborigines’ freedom ride was marked by the original freedom riders revisiting the places in country New South Wales where in 1965 they had shone the spotlight on how Aboriginal people were barred from accessing public venues. Aboriginal people had already…

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