Blogs by Bahais

A compilation


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Baha’i Chronicles

 

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Baha’i Chronicles have a newsletter you can subscribe to HERE  and then you’ll find out when new stories have been added.

Baha’i Chronicles can found HERE

 

Here is a sample of the latest newsletter.

Musa Banani

Researched by Sue Chehrenegar on Dec 26, 2015 12:00 am

Musa Banani Born: 1886/1887Death: September 4, 1971 Place of Birth: Baghdad, IraqLocation of Death: Kampala, UgandaBurial Location: The National Baha’i Cemetery of Uganda, Kampala, Uganda
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Siyyid Mirza Husayn-i-Mutavalli

Researched by Bahá’í Chronicles on Dec 26, 2015 12:00 am

Siyyid Mirza Husayn-i-Mutavalli was the recipient of the Tablet Shikkar-Shikan-Shavand. This man was a Babi who had been with 300 others under the leadership of Quddus at the Tabarsi fort, where they were attacked and starved.
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Recent Articles:

Beulah Storrs Lewis
Carole Lombard Gable
Ḥájí Faraju’lláh Tafríshí
Mirza Ali-Muhammad (Varqa) and Ruhu’llah Varqa
Jináb-i-Muníb

 

 


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Salt of the earth

the Book of Pain

Persians say that a salad is best made
with a miser to pour on vinegar,
a rich man to drizzle on oil
and a crazed man to heap on garlic.
What I got was a sweet man
who sprinkled everything he owned,
joyously, on everyone’s plate.

This story comes from a Bahá’í conference that took place in Bukavu, Rwanda, a town along the border with the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or what was then called Zaire. The main conference meal consisted of salad greens, roast goat, beans and manioc, the local term for the cassava tuber from which tapioca is derived. (Most Westerners don’t like manioc, but I developed a bit of a taste for it. But I’ll eat anything, so this was not surprising to my family.)

He was an elderly gentleman who, with a radiant heart, shared with us what we worried was just about all he owned…

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Gumboots4Peace

Pearlz Dreaming

gumboots4peace2 Gumboots4Peace  by June Perkins 2006

 I do not want the peace that passeth understanding. I want the understanding which bringeth peace. -Helen Keller

We had moved to the Cassowary Coast, land of a big golden gumboot.

I went to an exhibition in the city sometime whilst we were living there, and discovered  a picture in an exhibition where an artist took his shoes for a walk like they were a pair of puppies.

They had personality.

He was fearless with his photographs.

I saw an online installation of soldiers’ shoes at a war memorial.

In my mind an idea formed,  why not have gumboots that had a message of peace.

They could be installed anywhere, decorated with peace messages, or anything the artist wanted to say about peace.

Perhaps people could pose with the boots.

What fun would that be!

Everywhere I traveled  I took pictures of boots calling people…

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Seriously? Yes, of course Christians and Muslims worship the same God.

Reblogged from Ed Hollison  Fruit Tree Blog

I recently became acquainted with the story of Larycia Hawkins, a professor at a Evangelical Protestant college here in the U.S. who was suspended for publicly asserting that Christians and Muslims worship the same God. What I found particularly remarkable about this story wasn’t what it revealed about the current state of free speech on college campuses, currently a red-hot subject of debate. What was more striking was that, apparently, many people somehow believe that Christians and Muslims worship different gods.

Here’s how one particular article about Hawkins kicked off:

Do Muslims and Christians worship the same God? It’s a question that has bedeviled theologians and everyday believers for centuries.

I almost lost my souvlaki sandwich reading this sentence. Have theologians really been debating this for centuries? If so, then shame on them for such a massive waste of time.

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Favourite Christmas Posts

Pearlz Dreaming

Just sharing my favourite Christmas posts from facebook.

  1.  A reading of Dickens’ Christmas Carol by Neil Gaiman (begins about 12 minutes in, lovely introductory talk about treasures at a museum)

2.  Wishing all faiths peace.  I love this image representing many world religions.

Faith From The Facebook site Faith

3. Literary Christmas Quotes from Writers Write – some interesting quotes from writers.

Here are just two, read the rest at the post.

What kind of Christmas present would Jesus ask Santa for? ~Salman Rushdie

Christmas is built upon a beautiful and intentional paradox; that the birth of the homeless should be celebrated in every home. ~G.K. Chesterton

4. Maya Angelou – a message from Maya’s family who keep her facebook alive.

“We clap hands and welcome the Peace of Christmas.
We beckon this good season to wait a while with us.
We, Baptist and Buddhist, Methodist and Muslim, say come.
Peace.
Come…

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What a difference a day makes – day 2

the Book of Bokeh

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This is the second post of two showing how variable the weather can be in New England, especially in the autumn. The first post is here.

These photos were taken on the day following, and at around the same time, as the previous post. The lake is just west of the small village of Killingly, CT, 1 to 2 miles (2 to 3 km) from the site of the previous day’s set.

By the way, the photo of the ducks taking off is not a crop from a larger photo, but the full photo itself. That was the effect of the mist that morning: super quiet when no carries were whizzing by, cool, eerie even. The panoramas may be the best ones I’ve done thus far.

As always, special thanks to my dearest spouse Lyn, who does all the heavy lifting in selecting the photos. And thank you sincerely for dropping by the Book…

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Generosity – By Dan

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Generosity (take 1)

 

December 6, 2015: 1.5 hours, 3 children, ages 6–9. Pretty good class with some good teamwork this week. One of our families was away, so we had fewer children in attendance, but it was fun all the same. Instead of having them work in their workbooks, we had the children create their own personal prayer books, for storing prayers and quotes that they learn throughout the year. The point of these is to give the children something to read from when it’s time to say prayers.

We picked up a book of craft paper, folded it around ten pages or so of lined paper, and punched holes in the side to allow us to bind the whole thing together with ribbon. They enjoyed the craft; let’s see how much use they get out of the books now that they’re done!

The rest of the class went pretty well. The children were a little less eager to say prayers this week, but hey, there are on and off days. Studying the prayer and practicing the song were easy; the prayer was the same as last time, and the song was easier to learn than the previous one. We included a story and a game in the day’s schedule, but as the class progressed we realized that we were running out of time; we also needed ten minutes at the end of the class for a country presentation.

So after we were done preparing the lesson, we ended up moving back over to the craft table to give them time to finish up their work on their prayer books. It’s a bummer, because we didn’t spend a lot of time on activities that directly supported the lesson—only the song was directly related, really. Hopefully we can do “part two” of this lesson next week, though, and make a little more time for the extra activities.

The country presentation was about the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as told by one of our Bahá’í friends who had grown up there. The older children studiously took notes as she was presenting(!), writing things like where it is, the fact that it has not only lots of jungle but also big cities

(For instance, the capital Kinshasa has ten million people in it), what kinds of special foods people eat there, what language they speak, and what kinds of endangered animals live there. All in all, it was an engaging presentation that gave a good overview of the country.

I must admit that I was skeptical about adding the country presentations to the class at first, but they all turn out to be pretty interesting, even if they’re not directly related to the topic of the lesson. It’s nice to have that extra element of cultural discovery in our classes, since it helps the children discover what’s outside the bubble of their own culture.

I just hope we can make sure to focus enough on the topic during the rest of the class, which I feel like we didn’t do this week—that is, we spent a lot of time talking about things other than generosity. Maybe we can work on that next week; we’ll have someone in to do a presentation on Australia, so we’ll see how that goes.