Blogs by Bahais

A compilation


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Nineteen Months

Webpage

I just came across an inspiring blog/website which has practical inspiration for Baha’i life and art and idea for the whole year.

It involves mainly photographers but also creatives working other forms, many of whom maintain blogs and websites.

This site is well worth a visit and I have just begun to explore the links of various contributors and add them to our sidelinks here.

“Nineteen Months values photography and writing that draws its inspiration from the Baha’i calendar. Our artistic images and practical ideas for living a Baha’i life come from a far-flung group of contributors, with different viewpoints and aptitudes. If you’re interested in collaborating with us get in touch.

Inspired by an annual month-long project called Nineteen Days, this site was founded in 2010 as a photography blog with images that reflect the essence of the name of each Baha’i month. Nineteen Months has grown since its inception to include articles on a variety of issues that Baha’is confront throughout the year.”

“Also called the Badi‘ calendar, the Baha’i calendar has 19 months with 19 days each. The months are named after the attributes of God, as are the days of the week. There are a few days in the calendar that fall outside the months, called Ayyam-i-ha.”

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Autonomous

WritersDream9

We All Stand Alone, Together. We All Stand Alone, Together. Thank you dollarphotoclub

Like the fingers on the hands we are interrelated

Dependent upon one another with much in common

However we are also standing alone with our own names

This is true and for this we can not ever be berated

One finger there may be adornmed another is naked

One is powerful and capable while another is stubborn

There are many things to do with them, moves, fun and games

We are like them this for sure if only we’d see we are related

We all come from the same place and This we have deleted

We’ll return to Him and find ourselves for things done reborn

This is where we’ll be forgiven in the Kingdom of His Names

So, let’s fight our spiritual battles one day at a time initiated

           Into this realm for the purpose of…

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Writing Empowerments: Ink from Ochre Extract

Following the Crow Song

cropped-ihavedreamcollage

Ong argues that writing can “enrich the human psyche, enlarge the human spirit, intensify its interior life.” [1]  In other words writing can be moulded to fit those who use it, and can extend rather than diminish subjectivity and intersubjectivity.   Max Van Manen describes the power of writing:

Writing fixes thoughts on paper.  It externalises what in some senses is internal; it distances us from our immediate lived involvements with the things of our world.  As we stare at the paper, and stare at what we have written, our objectified thinking now stares back at us.  This writing creates the reflective cognitive stance …[2]

Writing has a paradoxical power that comes from its ability to objectify as ideas are placed onto paper, yet as it objectifies it subjectifies.  It can do this because writing can represent a dialogue with the self.   Even though many Indigenous women write in…

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Review: A History of Australian Schooling

Stumbling Through the Past

Book cover of A History of Australian SchoolingA History of Australian Schooling by Craig Campbell and Helen Proctor (Crows Nest, NSW:Allen & Unwin, 2014).

For over a century Australian schools have acted as future-shapers. Since the era of compulsory schooling emerged in the Australian colonies during the late nineteenth-century, every Australian child has spent a number of years in school. Children take at least some of the ideas and behaviours that are developed in the classroom and in the playground with them for the rest of their lives. As such it surprises me that education history is seen as a ‘special interest’ and not a field that is part of the core of Australian history.

A History of Australian Schooling by Craig Campbell and Helen Proctor is a chance for people to catch up on the latest research in Australia’s schooling history in one readable volume. It is long overdue. When I started exploring the history of…

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The Terror of Conviction (1/3)

Everybody Means Something

Cruelty has a Human Heart,
And Jealousy a Human Face;
Terror the Human Form Divine,
And Secrecy the Human Dress.

William Blake: Songs of ExperienceAdditional Poem

In the wake of the anniversary of 9/11 and as a response, however inadequate, to the enormity of the recent beheadings of three innocent hostages by IS, I feel it is worth republishing a sequence of posts I first published several years ago. The situation in the world is at least as fraught as it was then, if not more so, making the sequence still as relevant now. Moreover, I feel that the ideas I tried to pull together continue to deserve careful attention if we are to learn how to respond effectively to those influences within and around us that might pull us into the quicksand of extremism. This is the first of three posts on consecutive days.

Terror and the Human Form

The…

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Walking the past in the present

Pearlz Dreaming

nestedhands2e

Time is a culturally bound construct. We may, based on what culture we are born into, think we move chronologically, but in many cultures we carry the memory and ancestors with us in stories, songs and myths and a belief in the presence of spirits.

The past walks with present and the present with the future.

We can use our memory, past, wisdom to assist the present if only we pay attention to it.

In writing of lands I have lived and traveled through in an organic and intuitive process I find connections that make a spiral, even a circle, rather than a straight line.

Whilst we physically can’t change the past our understanding of it can dramatically change based on the patterns we find there.

I like the idea of spirals more than circles because in a spiral you can progress even as you seem to circle back to…

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